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Care Act 2014

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Within North East Lincolnshire focus independent adult social work provide Adult Social Care on behalf of the Local Authority or Council. Where this material refers to 'council' or 'local authority' it refers to focus independent adult social work. To find out more information about focus independent adult social work and how this unique partnership working is undertaken please see below. 

These include North East Lincolnshire Council, NAViGO Health and Social Care, NHS North East Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group and Care Plus Group.

focus independent adult social work within North East Lincolnshire, is commissioned by your Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) & the Local Authority, North East Lincolnshire Council. We are a Social Enterprise (CIC), known as a Social Work Practice.

The Social Work Practice is made up of the following areas:-

  • Complex Case Management Teams provide complex case management to older people (including those with a mental health issue) and all adults with physical, sensory or learning disabilities.
  • A3 is the service that provides the gateway to Adult Social Work / Care
  • Adult Safeguarding Team
  • Continuing NHS Healthcare Team
  • All Business Support Functions including Community Care Finance

Since April 2011, adult social work in NEL has been operating as a Social Work Practice pilot, one of seven established nationally through the Department of Health. We are now ready, enthusiastic and excited about taking the next step and being a free standing social enterprise, which was formed in September 2013. It enables us the opportunity to radically change the way we do things, making use of the flexibilities which operating outside the public sector affords us in order to improve outcomes for the most vulnerable people in North East Lincolnshire.  We are keen to embed our social work practice in communities and neighbourhoods and take forward the development of preventative interventions.

Being close to and involved in our local communities will be at the heart of what we do. We are working to change the focus of social work away from 1:1 client work to that of ‘community broker’, enabling people to take control themselves, to make full use of the community assets available and to develop new community capacity. This requires flexibility, innovation, fleetness of foot, an entrepreneurial culture and the fostering of partnerships and alliances.

Empowering and supporting our staff will be critical to our success. We have a well established staff team that have played a major role in the journey we have been on over the last three years. With a flatter management structure and devolved roles and responsibilities our aim is to ensure that staff feel an integral part of the new organisation able to influence and be involved in decision making.

The organisation has approximately 150 staff with an operating budget of £4m and have joint responsibility with the NELCCG (in full) for care and support budgets of £28m. A Board of Governors with an independent chair; employee, community, user and carer representation as well as representatives from the NEL CCG and local Council will oversee the social enterprise which will be established as a Community Interest Company. All employees are eligible and encouraged to become members of the organisation and membership constituencies for the community and service users and carers are to be established.

This is a fantastic opportunity to establish and drive forwards a brand new organisation based on social work values.

Joe Warner

Managing Director

@focus_Warner @focus_SWP

 Media Coverage

What is the Care Act?

Care Act Summary

Care and support is changing for the better

From April 2015, care and support in England is changing for the better. The new Care Act will help make the care and support system more consistent across the country. ‘Care and support’ is the term used to describe help for adults of all ages with things like washing, dressing, eating, getting out and about and keeping in touch with friends or family. Many of us will need care and support at some point in our lives, and most people will pay at least something towards the cost of their care. The new national changes are designed to help you plan for the future and put you more in control of the help you receive. Any decisions about your care and support will consider your wellbeing and what is important to you and your family, so you can stay healthy and remain independent for longer.

If you receive care and support, or you support someone as a carer, you could benefit from the changes.

Care Act Animation

 

Introduction to the Care Act - SCiE

Needs

From April 2015, the way care and support needs are assessed in England is changing for the better, meaning that decisions made about the help you receive will consider your wellbeing and what is important to you and your family. For the first time, there will be a national level of care and support needs that all councils will consider when they assess what help they can give you. This may result in you being eligible for care and support, and will make it easier for you to make plans now and in the future. If you decide to move to another area, councils will also have to work together to make sure that there is no gap in your care when you move. If you receive care and support, you will be more in control of decisions that affect you, and of putting together a care plan tailored to your needs. Your plan will work out how you can do the things that are important to you and your family, with the right level of care and support. You will also know how much it will cost to meet your needs and how much the council will contribute towards the cost. You will have more control over how that money is spent. Everyone’s needs are different. They may be physical or emotional. You may find that the support you need could be met by something going on in your local community, for example services organised by local charities or other support networks. Whatever your level of need, your council will be able to put you in touch with the right organisation to support your wellbeing and help you remain independent for longer.

Support for Carers

In England, millions of people provide unpaid care or support to an adult family member or friend, either in their own home or somewhere else. ‘Caring’ for someone covers lots of different things, like helping with their washing, dressing or eating, taking them to regular appointments or keeping them company when they feel lonely or anxious. If this sounds like you, from April 2015, changes to the way care and support is provided in England mean you may be able to get more help so that you can carry on caring and look after your own wellbeing. You may be eligible for support, taken as a personal budget to spend on the things that make caring easier, or practical support, like arranging for someone to step in when you need a short break. You may prefer to be put in touch with local support groups so you have people to talk to.
The council covering the area where the person you care for lives can help you find the right support and may suggest that you have a carer’s assessment. A carer’s assessment will look at the different ways that caring affects your life and work out how you can carry on doing the things that are important to you and your family. Your physical and emotional wellbeing will be at the heart of this assessment. As a result of the assessment, you may be eligible for support from the council, who will also offer you advice and guidance to help you with your caring responsibilities. You can have a carer’s assessment even if the person you care for does not get any help from the council, and they will not need to be assessed.

Deferred Payment Agreements

Care and support is changing for the better. From April 2015 the deferred payment agreements which some councils in England currently offer, will be available across the whole country. This means that people should not have to sell their homes in their lifetime to pay for their care, as they have sometimes had to do in the past. A deferred payment agreement is an arrangement with the council that will enable some people to use the value of their homes to fund residential care home costs. If you are eligible, your council will pay your residential care home bills on your behalf. You can delay repaying the council until you choose to sell your home, or until after your death. Deferred payment agreements will suit some people’s circumstances better than others’. Councils may charge interest on the amount owed to them, and there may also be a fee for setting this arrangement up. A deferred payment agreement is only one way to pay for care. To find out more about the options available, you can speak to a financial advisor or seek advice from an independent organisation such as the Money Advice Service.

What is personalisation?

Social Care Institute for Excellence (scie)

What is changing?

The new law is very detailed. You can download some short leaflets below, which explain the main changes:

  • For the first time, all councils in England will consider the same national level of care and support needs when we assess what help we can give you.
  • Carers may be able to get more help so that they can carry on caring and look after their own wellbeing.
  • Deferred payments will be available for people who need to move into permanent, residential care. This means that people should not usually have to sell their home in their lifetime to pay for their care.

What about the financial changes?

More changes to the way people pay for care and support will be introduced in 2016. These will protect people with the highest needs from facing unlimited costs, and include a proposal to introduce a cap on care costs of £72,000.

The exact details are subject to a government consultation, so we regret that we are unable to give more information or to discuss the proposed care cap at this time. Please contact us in the autumn.

What do I need to do now?

If you already receive care and support from focus independent adult social work, nothing will change without us talking to you first. If you think the new law might affect you or someone you know, please get in touch:

  • You can email us at: focus@nhs.net 
  • You can complete an online self-assessment
  • You can call the Single Point of Access on 0147 256 256

If you are a care provider, please see our 'What if I'm an Employer' section below which contains further information. 

What will this mean for me living in NEL?

We are currently in the process of recording videos for the following - please check back soon.

  • Prevention & Wellbeing with Ros Davey, Head of Demand Management & Communities

Prevention Explanation Video

  • Assessments & Support Planning with Christine Jackson, Head of Case Management, Performance & Finance

  • Safeguarding Adults with Sue Bunn, Head of Safeguarding

  • Single Point of Access with Sarah Brown & Jon Madden, A3 Asessors

  • Charging with Sarah Hawker, Head of Business Development & Client Finance

What if I need to speak to someone about this?

Different ways to help someone with care and support needs (or a carer with support needs)

Acting as an Attorney

An attorney is someone who is appointed under an Enduring Power of Attorney document (EPA), or a Lasting Power of Attorney document (LPA). An attorney is appointed by the person needing help. The person making the appointment must have mental capacity to understand the choice they are making, and the implications of appointing an attorney. 

You can help make or make decisions about someone’s money and property if they appointed you using an EPA.  It is no longer possible to appoint an attorney under an EPA, but if the EPA was made and signed before 1st October 2007 it can still be used.  If the person who appointed you starts to lose, or has lost mental capacity, you must register the EPA with the Office of the Public Guardian. 

There are two types of LPAs:

  • Property and financial affairs (e.g. paying bills, organising a pension etc)
  • Health and welfare (e.g. making decisions about medical treatment and how someone is looked after) 

You could be appointed under one or both types of LPA.  The LPA(s) or EPA will set out the limits of your authority to act on behalf of the person who has appointed you.  An attorney must always act in the best interests of that person. 

For more information about being an attorney, visit the website below.

Acting as a Deputy 

You can apply to become someone’s deputy if they lack mental capacity - this means they can’t make a decision for themselves at the time the decision needs to be made. They may still be able to make decisions for themselves at other times. 

There are two types of deputy:

  • Property and financial affairs (e.g. paying bills, organising a pension etc)
  • Personal welfare (e.g. making decisions about medical treatment and how someone is looked after) 

You can apply to the Court of Protection to act as one or both types of deputy.  If your application to become a deputy is successful, you’ll be authorised by the Court of Protection to make decisions on behalf of the person without capacity.  The Court of Protection will send you an order setting out what you can and can’t do as the person’s deputy. As deputy, you must always act in the person’s best interests. 

For more information about becoming a deputy, visit the website below.

Direct Payments: Acting as a Nominated or an Authorised Person 

Direct payments are money payments made to individuals to meet some or all of their eligible care and support needs. Individuals can request these to allow them to choose how their eligible needs are met, and to give them control by enabling them to buy their own care and support. Direct payments can also be made to someone other than the person with needs. The person who receives the payment is known as the Nominated or Authorised Person, depending on whether the person with needs has mental capacity or not. 

  • Nominated Person: a Nominated Person is someone who agrees to manage a direct payment on behalf of the person with needs, where the person with needs has mental capacity. Direct payments can be made to a Nominated Person if the person with needs requests it, and certain conditions are met.
  • Authorised Person: an Authorised Person is someone who agrees to manage a direct payment for a person who lacks mental capacity to make decisions for themselves at the time the decision needs to be made. An Authorised Person can request direct payments on behalf of the person with needs, where certain conditions are met. 

For more information on direct payments, go to the Financial, Legal & Benefits sections within the Information, Advice and Guidance Portal.

What if I need this information in British Sign Language?

The following marketing information and material was produced by the Department of Health, UK.

Care Act - Care & Support is changing for the better (British Sign Language) 

Care Act - Carers  (British Sign Language)

Care Act - Deferred Payment Agreements (British Sign Language)

What if I need this information in Audio?

The following marketing information and material was produced by the Department of Health, UK. You will be able to download and listen to Audio transcribes of the following tops:

What if I need this information in print form? (Leaflets, posters etc)

Please come back soon to view localised marketing material being produced by partners across North East Lincolnshire.

What if I need this information in another language or Braille?

If you require this information in a different language, please use the Google translate button at the end of this webpage and throughout Services4Me. You will also then be able to print this if required. If you require a braille version please contact focus independent adult social work Communications Team on 0300 330 2940.

What if I'm an employer and need materials to share in my workplace?

We see the following areas as being of interest to providers in the care sector:

  • Everyone will have a responsibility to make sure people are aware of their rights and responsibilities, and provide advocacy where necessary. There is a clear expectation that providers will keep people informed and help them plan for their future care.
  • To help us prepare for the implementation of the financial reforms, people who are currently not known to focus, including self-funders, will be able to come forward from October 2015. We will be asking providers to:
  • tell us now how many self-funders they currently provide a service for, to help manage the likely demand for Care Accounts; and
  • engage with service users about their right to a Care Account so that they can contact us if they wish.

National Care & Support Public Information Campaign Materials

The Department of Health and Public Health England are working to help raise public awareness of the Care and Support reforms being introduced in April 2015 and into 2016.

A public information campaign is underway to help ensure those who are affected by the reforms (existing care and support service users, people approaching the point of need and carers) are aware of the changes, and know where to go for further information.

This page has been developed to host a range of campaign materials for trusted partners to download and cascade through their individual networks.

If you would like to receive further campaign updates please click here

Media Coverage

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What is care and support?

‘Care and support’ is the term used to describe the help some adults need to live as well as possible with any illness or disability they may have. It can include help with things like getting out of bed, washing, dressing, getting to work, cooking meals, eating, seeing friends, caring for families and being part of the community.

It might also include emotional support at a time of difficulty and stress, helping people who are caring for an adult family member or friend or even giving others a lift to a social event.

Care and support includes the help given by family and friends, as well as any provided by the council or other organisations.
 

What is changing?

From April 2015, care and support in England is changing for the better. The new Care Act will help make care and support more consistent across the country.

The new national changes are designed to put you in control of the help you receive. Any decisions about your care and support will consider your wellbeing and what is important to you and your family, so you can stay healthy and remain independent for longer.

Some changes will be introduced in April 2015 and others in April 2016.

As part of the 2016 changes, we will provide more financial help for those who need it and people with modest means will benefit too. There will also be a new form of protection from unlimited care costs – You may have heard this referred to as the cap on care costs.


What was wrong with the old system?

As people are now living longer and with a better quality of life, the care and support needs they have are different. The way care and support is provided has to change to reflect this. A new Care Act has been passed to make care and support, and the way we pay for it, clearer, easier to access and more consistent across the whole of England.

Will the changes affect me?

You may benefit from the changes to care and support if you:

  • receive care and support from your council or another organisation, either at home or in a care home
  • give unpaid care and support to an adult family member or friend
  • think you may need care and support in the near future, either for yourself or for someone you help
     

How will the changes make things better?

The changes mean that more people will be able to get the care and support they need, either from the council or from other organisations in the community. Different ways to pay for care and support will be available across the whole of England, so people should not have to sell their home in their lifetime to pay for care. People who receive care and support from the council will have more say over what sort of help they get. There will also be more help available for people who give unpaid care and support to an adult family member or friend.

From April 2016, financial support will be available to more people, and everyone will be protected from unlimited care and support costs.
 

What’s the difference between care and support from the council and the care I receive at home from NHS?

Care and support organised by the council can include help with everyday things like washing and dressing, getting in and out of bed, and keeping your home clean and safe.

As well as care and support organised by us, some people are also eligible to receive help from the NHS. This help may be a nursing service for people who are ill or recovering at home after leaving hospital. It could include things like changing the dressings on wounds or giving medication. If you are eligible for this kind of help, a health professional such as your GP or Community Nurse should be able to tell you.

In exceptional circumstances, where an adult has a complex medical condition and substantial on-going care needs, the NHS provides a service called NHS Continuing Healthcare. NHS Continuing Healthcare provides care and support in a person’s home, care home or hospice.

What is a needs assessment?

A needs assessment is a discussion between you (or the person you look after if you are a carer) and a trained person either from the council or another organisation that the council works with, where you will talk about the care and support needs you have and the goals you want to achieve. It could be done face to face or over the telephone. We will use the assessment to identify your care and support needs, and to discuss how these could be met. This might mean that the council will give you help or put you in touch with other organisations, such as local charities, that you can talk to.

Who should have a needs assessment?

If you think you have any care and support needs, you can contact the council to ask for an assessment. If you are a carer and you need some support, get in touch with the council covering the area where the person you care for lives. The council will be able to give you information and advice about how the assessment will work.

What will be considered during the needs assessment?

The needs assessment will consider what care and support needs you have and how these affect your wellbeing.  This will include identifying any physical needs, such as whether you need help to wash or dress, get in and out of bed or keep your home safe to live in. The assessment will also look at your mental and emotional needs and ask what is important to you in how you live your life, such as being able to carry on working or volunteering, or being able to meet your friends. 

Everyone’s needs and the ways they affect people’s wellbeing are different.  Identifying your needs and the things you want to achieve will help us to decide if we can help. Depending on what needs you have, we may give you information and advice about other kinds of support available locally that can help you, such as charities or community groups.

Is a needs assessment the same as a carer’s assessment?

A ‘needs assessment’ is an assessment of an adult who may need care and support. A ‘carer’s assessment’ is for someone who gives care and support to an adult family member or friend. Caring can include lots of different things, like helping with their washing, dressing or eating, taking them to regular appointments or keeping them company when they feel lonely or anxious.

Can I get someone to help me with my assessment?

The assessment is about you and we will make sure that you are able to be involved.  If you wish, then your carer, a friend or family member can help and represent you.  If you don’t have a carer, family member or friend who you can ask, and you have a lot of difficulty doing the assessment yourself, the council will find an independent advocate to help you.

Will I need to be re-assessed?

If you are already receiving care and support from us, you do not need to ask for a reassessment. We will contact you if there are any changes that affect you.  If your needs have changed recently and you feel like you need more care and support, you can ask for a new assessment.

Who will do the assessment?

Lots of different people can carry out assessments - as long as they have the right training. The person doing your assessment could be a social worker or care manager, or it could be someone else.  We will make sure that whoever carries out your assessment has the right training.  You could also be offered a supported self-assessment. This means you do your assessment yourself with help from the council.

Will the council look into my finances?

A needs assessment won’t ask about your finances. But if you are eligible for care and support from the council, you may have to pay something towards the cost. To find out how much you might need to pay, we may ask you to do a financial means test and you would then need to disclose details about your savings, assets and income.

How will I know if I have eligible needs?

For the first time, there will be a national level of care and support needs that all councils will consider when we assess what help we can give you.

The council will assess your care and support needs with you, and decide if they are at the level where you need help from us.  Your needs could be eligible if you are not able to do a combination of certain things that seriously effects your wellbeing. These may include washing yourself, getting dressed, getting in and out of bed or keeping your home safe for you to live in.

After the assessment we will write to you about our decision and give you reasons to explain what we have decided.

If you have eligible needs, we will contact you to discuss what help might be available.  This will be based on the information you gave us during your assessment.  As far as possible the council will agree your care and support plan with you.

If you do not have needs that are eligible, we will give you information and advice about what care and support is available to help you locally. This could be help from local charities or voluntary organisations for example.

What happens if my needs are not eligible for care and support from the council?

Everyone’s needs are different. They may be physical, mental or emotional. You may find that the support you need could be met by something going on in your local community, for example services organised by local charities or other support networks. Whatever your level of need, we will give you information and advice that can help you. We might also be able put you in touch with other organisations who can support your wellbeing and help you remain independent for longer.

I pay for my own care, do I need to be assessed by the council?

If you have arranged care and support yourself, either in your own home or in a care home, you do not need to be assessed by the council.

I pay for my own care, how do I get my cap on care costs account started?

To benefit from the cap on care costs from April 2016, you will need an assessment to see if you have any eligible needs. If you do have eligible needs, we will work out if we can help you and we will calculate how much it should cost to meet your needs. This amount will count towards your cap.

How will the new national level of needs affect you if you are planning to move?

The new national level will give you peace of mind that if you decide to move to another area in England, the new council will meet at least the same minimum level of care and support needs as your old one. Councils will also have to work together to make sure that there is no gap in your care.

If I am receiving care and support and decide to move, will I lose the help I currently get?

If you have needs that meet the new national level, you will be able to get some help from your council wherever you live in England. Although the level of need councils use to decide whether or not they can help will be the same across the country, the help they give you might be different in different areas. For example, one council might provide a buddying service to stop people from feeling lonely, whilst another might help people to stop feeling lonely by introducing them to community events in their area.

What is a carer?

In England, millions of people provide unpaid care or support to an adult family member or friend, either in their own home or somewhere else.

‘Caring’ for someone covers lots of different things, like helping with their washing, dressing or eating, taking them to regular appointments or keeping them company when they feel lonely or anxious.
If this sounds like you, you are considered to be a ‘carer.’

From April 2015, care and support in England is changing for the better, and if the person you care for is an adult (aged 18 or over) you may be able to get more help to carry on caring and look after your own wellbeing.

What is ‘support for carers’?

‘Support for carers’ is what we mean by the help and advice that carers can get from the council, national services and local networks. As a carer, you may be able to get more help so that you can carry on caring and look after your own wellbeing.

What is changing?

From April 2015, changes to the way care and support is provided in England mean you may be eligible for practical support, like arranging for someone to step in when you need a short break.  Or you may prefer to be put in touch with local support groups so you have people to talk to.

The council covering the area where the person you care for lives can help you find the right support and you can ask them for a carer’s assessment.

A carer’s assessment will look at the different ways that caring affects your life and work out how you can carry on doing the things that are important to you and your family.  Your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing will be at the heart of this assessment. As a result, you may be eligible for support from the council, who will also offer you advice and guidance to help you with your caring responsibilities.

You can have a carer’s assessment even if the person you care for does not get any help from the council, and they will not need to be assessed.

Am I eligible for support?

The council covering the area where the person you care for lives can help you find the right support and you can ask them for a carer’s assessment. The carer’s assessment will help to decide what care and support you need and how much help the council can give you.

What about parents caring for disabled children, or young carers who are under 18?

If you are a young carer yourself, or if you are a parent caring for a disabled child, you have similar rights to assessment and support but they are covered by the Children and Families Act, not the new Care Act.

If you or the person you are caring for is about to reach the age of 18 years, you will be able to get a ‘transition assessment’ which will let you know whether you or they are likely to be eligible for support as an adult caring for another adult.

The Department for Education will soon be publishing further information on the rights of parent carers and young carers and how councils should support them.

How might a carer’s assessment help me?

If you provide care and support to an adult friend or family member, you may be eligible for practical support, like arranging for someone to step in when you need a short break.  Or you may prefer to be put in touch with local support groups so you have people to talk to.

A carer’s assessment will consider the impact the care and support you provide is having on your own wellbeing and important aspects of the rest of your life.

When can I request a carer’s assessment?

You can ask for a carer’s assessment at any time.  You should contact the council covering the area where the person you care for lives, if it is not the same as your own. If you don’t want a carer’s assessment but you are looking for advice and information about local support, the council will be able to help you.

What will be considered during the assessment?

A carer’s assessment will look at the different ways caring affects your life and work out how you can carry on doing the things that are important to you and your family. It should cover your caring role, your feelings about caring, your physical, mental and emotional health, and how caring affects your work, leisure, education, wider family and relationships.

Your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing will be at the heart of this assessment. This means that you will be able to tell the council how caring for someone is affecting your life and what could make things better for you and the person you look after.

Does having a carer’s assessment affect my right to get carer’s allowance?

Not at all. Having a carer’s assessment will not affect your right to receive a carer’s allowance.

Does having a carer’s assessment mean the council is judging the quality of care that I provide?

A carer’s assessment is about you and your wellbeing. It will consider the impact that caring is having on your life and what support might be available for you. Its purpose is not to judge the care that you provide.

Can I have a carer’s assessment if the person I care for does not currently get help from the council?

Yes. But you will need to do this through the council of the person that you support, if it is not the same as your own. You can also ask for an assessment for the person you care for, if you want to.

I share providing care with other family members/ friends. Can all of us have a carer’s assessment?

Everyone who gives unpaid care to an adult over the age of 18, and has some need for support, can request an individual carer’s assessment. They do not have to be done together.

I share providing care with other family members/ friends and we disagree about who provides the most. Will this affect the support that I may be offered?

This should not affect the support you may be offered. If you care for an adult family member of friend, and you feel like you need some support, you can contact the council covering the area where the person you care for lives to ask for a carer’s assessment.

If the council decides that you have needs that meet the new national level they will discuss with you what support they can provide.

If your needs are not eligible, the council will give you information and advice about other types of support that are available in your area. This may include putting you in touch with local charities or community organisations.

The person I am caring for will not agree to a needs assessment themselves. Could I still be offered support as a carer?

You don’t need the permission of the person you are caring for to request a carer’s assessment. You are entitled to ask for one in your own right. 

What happens if my needs change or if I need more support?

If either of these things happen, the council of the person that you support will be able to discuss your situation with you and agree the next steps to take.

What is the cap on care costs?

At the moment there is no limit to what care and support can cost, and this means that people with very high care needs may have to pay expensive bills. But care and support is changing for the better, and from April 2016 there will be a new form of protection from unlimited costs. This protection is called the ‘cap on care costs.’ 

It means that no-one will have to pay more than £72,000 towards the costs of their eligible care and support needs in their lifetime, and many people will pay much less. This applies to people funding their own care and support, as well as those helped by the council.

Alongside the cap on care costs from April 2016, extended financial support should ensure that more people are eligible for help with care and support costs. The council will assess your finances and we may be able to offer extra help if you cannot afford to pay. But most people will still have to contribute something towards the cost of their care and support.

Why is the cap on care costs being introduced?

Most people currently pay something towards their care and support costs, and will continue to do so.

The cap on care costs will protect those who may need many hours of care a day from unlimited care bills. It will also help people to plan for future care costs.

How will I benefit?

From April 2016, you will be able to register with the council to keep track of how much your care and support costs. We should still be able to help you even if you are only paying part of your care and support costs, or paying everything yourself.

From April 2016, if you get help from the council with your care and support costs already, we will start to count how much is being spent on your care straight away. If the amount the care element of the cost of meeting your eligible needs reaches £72,000, we will step in and pay for the rest of your care costs.

If you pay for all of your care and support costs yourself, you can still benefit from the cap on care costs from April 2016. You can contact the council to register and we will assess you to decide if you have eligible needs. If you do have eligible needs, we will calculate how much it will cost to meet those needs. This amount will be counted towards your cap. If the amount counted towards your cap reaches £72,000, we will step in and pay for the rest of the care costs that go towards meeting your eligible needs.

To benefit from the cap on care costs from April 2016, you will need to register with us so that we can begin to keep track of how you are progressing towards the cap. This will need to be discussed and agreed.

What is excluded from the cap on care costs?

If you choose to spend more on care and support than the council would normally pay, for example moving to a more expensive care home, those extra amounts you spend will not count towards your cap on care costs.

If you live in a care home, you will also have to pay something towards the costs of food, energy bills and accommodation, just as you would if you were living in your own home. These are known as ‘daily living costs’ and an amount for this will be set nationally. There are also some types of service that are not covered by the cap on care costs, for example the cost of a cleaner or gardener that you employ privately.

Feedback

The Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) is an opportunity for you to let us know what it’s like to receive NHS services as a patient, relative or friend.  It offers you the chance to provide comments, compliments or raise concerns about the services you have received and helps the Trust to ensure that high quality, responsive services are available.

PALS is a free, confidential service available to offer help, advice and information on NHS services and is designed to help patients, carers and staff get the best out of what the NHS has to offer.
North East Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has a dedicated PALS team dealing with matters relating to Primary Care Services in the local area. These include those NHS services offered from your GP Practice, Dental Surgery, Pharmacies (chemists) and Opticians and all Adult Social Care Services.

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