Skip to main content

Living at home now & in the future

Focus independent adult social work undertake all statutory adult social work functions on behalf of North East Lincolnshire Council.

Within North East Lincolnshire we want adults to be able to manage as much of their daily lives as they are able to. We strive to make the most of each adult’s ability to be independent.

There are a range of services and support to support you to do this:

  • Support with practical tasks like washing, dressing or eating can be provided by local home care agencies. There is list of locally approved providers here:  insert link to care at home agencies I cant find it on the CCG site, but they do need to provide one
  • There is a wide range of electronic equipment to keep you safe in the home, including monitors that can tell if you've fallen and raise the alarm; and sensors that detect escaping gas or overflowing water. 
  • There is equipment to help you within the house and when you are out and about.  Including walking sticks and frames, rise and recline chairs, smaller pieces of equipment to help with daily tasks and a range of sensory impairment related equipment.  
  • There are organisations to help with shopping and domestics tasks, house maintenance and gardening
  • There are also organisations which will deliver hot meals to home

Support with all of these can be found by using the search facility here insert link back to search

 

What if I need help to identify my needs and support? 

Who gets support?

Anyone over the age of 18 who lives in the county and needs practical help, due to frailty or illness, physical or learning disabilities, sight or hearing loss. Help is also available to people recovering from a hospital stay and needing temporary help to maintain their independence and quality of life. However, in order to work out just how much help is needed to make life easier for you, we do need to carry out an assessment.

What is an assessment? 

An assessment is a conversation with you to help us understand what help and support you might need.  We will explore areas of your day to day life with you.  With your permission, we might also ask the opinion of other professionals who know and work with you, like your doctor, or community Nurse. We will also consider the needs of your family or carer and assess them separately if they ask us to.  Following the assessment, we will work with you to develop a support plan which will identify your needs and how they will be met.

Where does it take place?

An initial assessment will take place over the phone, when you first contact us.  If you progress to a formal adult social care assessment then this will be face to face, most likely within your own home.  You are able to invite those who are closest to you to accompany you. If you are in hospital, we'll come and talk to you before you are discharged to see about any help you might need in the home whilst you are recovering.  Remember we are only coming to see you to understand how you are coping day to day and how we might help to improve your quality of life. 

How quickly will this happen? 

If your situation is very urgent we will refer you for a same day assessment.  Although adult social care is required to undertake an assessment of need within 28 days, we constantly monitor referrals and will respond sooner if required.  We respect your privacy at all times. Any information you give us will be treated as confidential and will only be shared with anybody else involved in your care with your permission - other than in exceptional circumstances where the law says we must show it to someone else.

Will I be able to get help?

After the assessment we will identify and agree your needs with you and discuss the help and support available. 

To help us to decide whether a person is deemed to be eligible we use the Care and Support National eligibility criteria 2014. For an adult to meet the eligibility criteria, their needs must:

 

  • Arise from or are related to a physical or mental impairment or illness
  • As a result of the adults needs, the adult is unable to achieve two or more of the outcomes specified below
  • And as a result of being unable to meet two or more, there must be a significant impact on the adults wellbeing.

The specified outcomes are: 

(a)     managing and maintaining nutrition;

(b)     maintaining personal hygiene;

(c)     managing toilet needs;

(d)    being appropriately clothed;

(e)     being able to make use of the adult’s home safely;

(f)     maintaining a habitable home environment;

(g)     developing and maintaining family or other personal relationships;

(h)    accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering;

(i)      making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community including public transport, and recreational facilities or services; and

(j)      carrying out any caring responsibilities the adult has for a child.

We know that this may seem very complicated so if you would like us to explain this to you please get in touch. The Single Point of Access will be able to advise you.

You can contact them 24/7/365, including bank holidays and weekends. Phone 01472 256 256.

Which Council covers where I live?

Each authority or local council covers different wards and regions of North, North East and Lincolnshire. Please check where you live and which authroity you reside in. For North East Lincolnshire, please be aware focus independent adult social work now provide social work assessments of need on behalf of North East Lincolnshire Council.

Alternateively you can search the Direct Gov website using your poscode to find your local authority.

Which local providers can help me live independent?

Homecare

There are currently five lead “care at home” providers in North East Lincolnshire, commissioned by the CCG to deliver services to people who have been assessed as needing home care. We are currently commissioning nearly 9000 hours of care each week from our providers and the CCG and its partners are constantly monitoring the relative quality of this care. We work with providers to find new ways of commissioning this care to ensure it is as flexible and person centred as possible.

Services4me has a vast range of home care agencies in NEL, we have compiled the below search results for a quick list of all home care agencies:

Telecare & Telehealth Technology

Telecare services can help you to stay safe and remain more independent in your own home.

Telecare is a type of wireless technology that connects equipment in your home to a call centre using your telephone line.  There is a range of home equipment, devices and tools such as; wristbands that you press to alert the call centre if you need help and monitors that can detect falls, or gas, or overflowing water.

Telecare systems are available 24 hours a day, so you can call for help in an emergency at any time of the day or night.

Carelink offers reassurance, through telecare, to individuals who may be vulnerable through illness, disability, isolation, violence or abuse.

For more information about Telecare services and the range of solutions available, view the link to the Telecare leaflets below, or visit the Carelink website, or the AT Dementia website for information about assistive technologies for people with dementia and their carers.

What if I need help to identify my needs and support?

Who get's a care pacakge?

Anyone over the age of 18 who lives in the county and needs practical help, due to frailty or illness, physical or learning disabilities, sight or hearing loss. Help is also available to people recovering from a hospital stay and needing temporary help to maintain their independence and quality of life. However, in order to work out just how much help is needed to make life easier for you, we do need to carry out an assessment.

What is an assessment?

An assessment is simply a discussion with you that will help us understand what help and support you might need coping with life on a day to day basis and living independently in your own home.

Where does it take place?

It usually involves a chat over the phone, or in your own home and we're very happy if you have a friend, relative or carer with you. If you are in hospital, we'll come and talk to you before you are discharged to see about any help you might need in the home whilst you are recovering. The assessment is a two way conversation. We'll ask you to tell us something about yourself and you can tell us how you think we can help and support you. We might also ask the opinion of other professionals who know and work with you, like your doctor, but we will only do this with your permission. We will also take account of the needs of your family or carer and assess them separately if they ask us to.

Remember we are only coming to see you to understand how you are coping day to day and how we might help to improve your quality of life.

How quickly will this happen?

If your situation is very urgent and you are in a crisis or at serious risk of harm, we will aim to see you within 24 hours. If your carer is finding it very difficult to cope, we will try to see you within seven days. In any other circumstances it will be within 28 days of you asking for the assessment.

What about confidentiality?

We respect your privacy at all times. Any information you give us will be treated as confidential and will only be shared with anybody else involved in your care with your permission - other than in exceptional circumstances where the law says we must show it to someone else.

Will I be able to get help?

After the assessment we will identify and agree your needs with you and discuss the help and support available to meet them, according to the seriousness of your situation.

If you are eligible for help from focus independent adult social work / Adult Social Care we will aim to arrange this within seven days of the assessment being carried out. If you are not eligible for help, we will still give you information and advice on other services that are available to help you to continue to live independently and to maintain your quality of life. If you are not happy with the outcome of the assessment you can ask us to look at your situation again with you and if you are still not happy you can get in touch with us to make a comment, suggestion or complaint - information on how to do this can be found in the FEEDBACK section

Please click here if you would like more detailed information on how we use Department of Health guidance to decide how serious the risk to your independence is. We call this a priorities framework, which is based on the idea everybody will recieve an offer which is proportionate to thier presenting need.

After the assessment has been carried out we will look at your needs and consider them against the eligibility categories set by the Department of Health / local Priorities Framework. These describe the seriousness of the risk to your independence, or other consequences, if your needs are not met. We will work with you to meet your needs, or the needs of your carer, if they fall into the following priorities:

After the assessment, we will identify and agree your needs with you and discuss the help and support available to meet them, according to the seriousness of your situation.

We know that this may seem very complicated so if you would like us to explain this to you please get in touch. The Single Point of Access will be able to advise you. You can contact them 24/7/365, including bank holidays and weekends. Phone 01472 256 256.

If you don't qualify for a care package from Adult Social Care you could arrange to employ a care worker privately through a private home care agency, but remember to take care to choose one that is registered and inspected by the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Click on the link below to visit the CQC website for more information. Please see out 'What local providers can help me to stay independent at home'

We may provide or arrange services for you but there are other ways of getting the support you need. You can choose to have a Personal Budget and use the money that you receive from us to arrange your own support. An independent social worker is one option who could help you find the right care and make sure it works for you. Also see the useful contacts below.

What are Personal Budgets?

A personal budget is the amount of money that Adult Social Care Services says is available to you, to spend on your support. Having a personal budget means you can decide how you’d like your needs to be met; what type of support you want and how it should be provided. We want to give you as much choice and control as possible over your support. You can make it more flexible so that it fits in with the way you want to live your life. Your personal budget may pay for all the things in your support plan, although you might want to include other support that isn’t covered by your budget.

What is a support plan?

A support plan sets out the things that you need help with in your everyday life, and the things that you’d like to do if you had the right support or means to do them. The support plan will show how your support will be organised and managed; what you want to achieve by having that support; and how much it will cost. The leaflet explains how to find out whether you'll have a support plan.

Can somebody independent support me through the process?

From April 2015, care and support in England is changing for the better. The new Care Act will help make care and support more consistent across the country.

‘Care and support’ is the term we use to describe the help some adults need to live as well as possible with any illness or disability they may have. It can include help with things like washing, dressing, eating, getting out and about and keeping in touch with friends or family.

If you receive care and support, or you support someone as a carer, you could benefit from the changes.

What is advocacy?

Advocacy is helpful for people who find it hard to make decisions about the care and support they need. An advocate is a person who works with you to make sure that your ideas and wishes are heard and that you get the right care and support for you.

Who is advocacy for?

Advocacy is useful for:

  • children and young adults
  • an adult whose care and support needs are being assessed or reviewed
  • a carer whose needs are being assessed
  • people who are being assessed during a safeguarding enquiry.

How do I get advocacy?

focus independent adult social work must always make sure that you are involved in the decisions made about your care and support. 

If you (or someone you care for) finds it hard to:

  • understand and remember important information
  • use that information in daily life        or
  • express views, wishes or feelings

then focus must offer you an advocate to help you get the support and care you want and need. 

Tell me more about how an advocate can help me

Advocates are independent from the council, the NHS, your doctor, focus independent adult social work and other healthcare services. Your advocate will get to know you so they can support and represent you when decisions are made about your care. Your advocate will make sure that your wellbeing and interests are always carefully considered.

Your advocate will help you to:

  • understand the care and support process
  • talk about your wishes, views and feelings
  • make decisions
  • challenge council decisions about your care and support if you don’t agree with them
  • understand your rights
  • support you in the safeguarding process, if necessary.

If your advocate is provided by focus, we must also talk to your family or friends to help arrange the right support and care for you.

What about reviewing my needs?

focus independent adult social work will aim to review your care needs every year to make sure that you are getting the care and support you need. 

If you (or someone who knows you well) think your needs or financial position has changed, you can request an extra review to check whether your contribution towards your care has changed.  

A review might result in changes to your care and support plan and the services you receive. 

After the review, your council will send you a copy of your new care and support plan. 

Your care and support arrangements will not be changed without discussing it with you first. 

Alternative support for meals / meals on wheels

Community Meals, often known as 'meals on wheels', can help ensure that people receive proper nutrition on a daily basis, whatever their circumstances.

All the meals are nutritionally balanced, cooked locally and delivered hot to the home in foil containers. We recommend that you eat the meals hot, soon after delivery and do not try to reheat them. A typical meal will consist of a hot main course of meat or fish with vegetables and a hot or cold dessert. Diabetic, low carbohydrate, low fat, soft diet, gluten free and low sodium, as well as vegetarian, Halal, Kosher, Asian and Afro-Caribbean meals are also available.

Who can get meals on wheels?

This service is for people aged 18 and over, normally older people, who are unable to prepare and cook one hot meal a day. This may be a permanent situation due to sight loss, a physical or learning disability, illness or a temporary situation such as recovering after a stay in hospital, to help you maintain your independence and quality of life. If you or the person you care for find it difficult to get to the supermarket, there is a range of providers who operate locally who can offer this service privately or through a care package following an assessment of needs. As exaplined above.

You could also arrange for a carer to come in and prepare meals for you through a private home care agency but remember to take care to choose one that is registered and inspected by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

What if I need equipment or support to recover at home?

The Core Rehabilitation Team comprises of two of the range of Allied Health Profession (AHP) Services, specifically Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy. Core Rehabilitation services comprise of staff employed by Care Plus Group and Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust working in partnership.

If you are requesting an Occupational Therapy Assessment, please contact Single Point of Access Tel 01472 256256.

The Assisted Living Centre

The centre provides advice and information for people who require equipment and support at home to be able to maintain their independence.

People can get advice on a range of equipment available to help them at home including wheelchairs, hoists, walking frames and even home adaptations including stair lifts.

The community equipment store is based in the centre, where many of these items are loaned out from. It also has a demonstration area featuring a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and lounge, where people can see how equipment that could help them at home works. There are also clinic rooms, a wheelchair services workshop and a podiatry lab on-site as well.

The centre is open Monday to Friday, from 10am to 6pm (with last entry at 5.30pm), and Saturday’s 10am to 4pm (last entry 3.30pm).

Parking spaces are available for patients and visitors to the centre and are directly outside the building.

Directions:

From Second Avenue: Pedestrians can access the centre from Second Avenue via the gated path running alongside the Grimsby Grange Care Home.

From the hospital: Pedestrians and drivers can access the Assisted Living Centre by following the path/road immediately behind the Gardens/Rharian Fields, Navigo Buildings.

Contact us

Assisted Living Centre

Kingsley Grove

Diana, Princess of Wales Hospital

Grimsby

(01472) 875592

FEEDBACK

The Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) is an opportunity for you to let us know what it’s like to receive NHS services as a patient, relative or friend.  It offers you the chance to provide comments, compliments or raise concerns about the services you have received and helps the Trust to ensure that high quality, responsive services are available.

PALS is a free, confidential service available to offer help, advice and information on NHS services and is designed to help patients, carers and staff get the best out of what the NHS has to offer.
North East Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has a dedicated PALS team dealing with matters relating to Primary Care Services in the local area. These include those NHS services offered from your GP Practice, Dental Surgery, Pharmacies (chemists) and Opticians and all Adult Social Care Services.

Please rate this information/advice on this page

Back to top